Comments (4)

  1. hope 19.04.2017 at 20:47

    this is interestingly educative

  2. Tim Hill 19.04.2017 at 21:23

    Thank you, I’m glad you found it useful.

  3. Rebekah Hey 13.07.2018 at 09:33

    Hi Tim.
    I lost my sister 7 months ago. I’ve been in such a bad state since. I finally broke down and saw my G.P. today and he asked me about my mood. This didn’t compute for me at all. I could describe emotions but mood totally eluded me. So I googled it and there you were. I still don’t understand the difference. (I’m a young senior). It boggles my mind I could have lived this long, been in councelling for over a decade at one time, and today was the first time I was ever asked about mood.
    If you’re still out there thanks for writing about it.
    If you could break it down a bit more I would sure appreciate it.
    Rebekah

  4. Tim Hill 13.07.2018 at 10:38

    Hi Rebekah,
    I am sorry to hear about your loss – it seems this is still really hurting you, so good on you for going to get some support.
    It’s hard to know what your GP meant when he mentioned ‘mood’, as I think many people see mood and emotions as being the same thing. And that’s part of the difficulty of trying to be precise about definitions – the concepts are very similar, and will vary upon who you ask. However, mood generally refers to a longer-term state, such as the one you have been in since the loss of your sister. In contrast, emotions will be the short term reactive things you feel in response to immediate things. For example, if someone cuts you off when you’re driving, you might feel some momentary anger at that; if a young family member gives you a gift, you might experience some joy or gratitude. However, if these happened recently, then your mood is probably still your low feelings of grief and loss even through these experiences. Another analogy; your mood might be ‘winter’ but you can still have a sunny day.
    I hope this helps.
    Tim

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